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Showing posts from June, 2013

Ways to Add a Shot of Fun

Remember when we were toddlers and the world was filled with popsicles, play dates, and good ol' fashioned fun in the sun?

Yeah, 26 years later, I'm still not over it.

To me, trail running has always been about fun. Fantastical, whooping and hollering, screaming in fear and glee- fun. The ONLY time it was ever not fun was during my 2 peak training weeks, and even then... it was still a little fun.


Recently I read the best post I've seen about why trail running is perdy fun here.

I'm thoroughly enjoying a time where I can run what I want- instead of having mileage/vert/time goals... I am excited for a summer off of training where I still plan on running a lot, just with no structure. So as my friends embark into racing season, and the seriousness of utilizing all that training, $$, and preparation comes, I invite you to ditch the stress here and there and play a little more.




Tricks to Add a Shot of Fun:

6. Stop and smell the flowers: Or frolick in them. It's also us…

that WEIGHTY issue

It's been said to us climbers that what we do is dangerous, and irresponsible. How could we risk our lives like this? And distance trail running, if it compromises our health why do it? How dare we take that time away from our families? And yet, to even make mention about a different lifestyle, one of weight, obesity, and all of the very dangerous and risky components it involves is socially disgraceful, insensitive, and cruel. I bring this up only to show how much weight, in general, is not "ok" to talk about. It's a sensitive subject, even, no, especially, for those of us already at a healthy weight who use our bodies to their fullest daily...

Now, this blog is about running, ain't it? Yep. So while there's a lot of "weight" we could cover in this "weighty" area, we'll just go over one. Running.



Running and weight are intertwined. I'd like to say that this post is primarily for the ladies, because we typically store more weight tha…

that WEIGHTY issue

It's been said to us climbers that what we do is dangerous, and irresponsible. How could we risk our lives like this? And distance trail running, if it compromises our health why do it? How dare we take that time away from our families? And yet, to even make mention about a different lifestyle, one of weight, obesity, and all of the very dangerous and risky components it involves is socially disgraceful, insensitive, and cruel. I bring this up only to show how much weight, in general, is not "ok" to talk about. It's a sensitive subject, even, no, especially, for those of us already at a healthy weight who use our bodies to their fullest daily...

Now, this blog is about running, ain't it? Yep. So while there's a lot of "weight" we could cover in this "weighty" area, we'll just go over one. Running.
Running and weight are intertwined. I'd like to say that this post is primarily for the ladies, because we typically store more weight t…

Bryce 100: Race Report

"I think this is supposed to be the post where I mourn a sprained ankle and my first DNF at my first 100 (my 3rd ever ultra.) But I have nothing to mourn- I had a perfect day, filled with love, trails, friends, and family. I had one of those rare experiences where much of the day I was overflowing with joy and love and life. What is there to mourn? I didn't cross a finish line made of flour or win the trophy for first female? No trophy or belt buckle could give me more satisfaction than that beautiful, perfect first 70 miles and the satisfaction that the next 20 I tried my hardest to push through an inflaming injury. What a wonderful day, can't wait to get out there again. Thanks to everyone who supported and inspired me, and a special thanks to my crew and pacers who helped orchestrate what is now one of my most beautiful memories." -My post-race FB post

Last weekend I tried my first 100 mile race. I went into the race eager, a newbie to ultrarunning, with eyes on bi…

Bryce 100: Race Report

"I think this is supposed to be the post where I mourn a sprained ankle and my first DNF at my first 100 (my 3rd ever ultra.) But I have nothing to mourn- I had a perfect day, filled with love, trails, friends, and family. I had one of those rare experiences where much of the day I was overflowing with joy and love and life. What is there to mourn? I didn't cross a finish line made of flour or win the trophy for first female? No trophy or belt buckle could give me more satisfaction than that beautiful, perfect first 70 miles and the satisfaction that the next 20 I tried my hardest to push through an inflaming injury. What a wonderful day, can't wait to get out there again. Thanks to everyone who supported and inspired me, and a special thanks to my crew and pacers who helped orchestrate what is now one of my most beautiful memories." -My post-race FB post

Last weekend I tried my first 100 mile race. I went into the race eager, a newbie to ultrarunning, with eyes on b…