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Showing posts from March, 2014

Buffalo 100 Race Report: how the War was won

This is the first time I am excited to do a race report. I've never felt so.... happily overwhelmed with love, care, support, and kindness from so many people! The short story: I struggled with early vomiting, negativity, and decided to DNF at mile 27. Then I was talked out of it, rallied, and gave that race (literally) everything I had.
the startThe long story: Friday morning on the drive out to the Buffalo 100, I discussed with Craig and Scott our race plans. I asked Scott if he wanted to hang with me for some miles, saying my only plan was to "have a fun run with friends" until it wasn't fun anymore, and I'd go from there. Given my mishaps in training and tapering, I wanted to go out easy and see what happened. This would be my first time tracking only time of day for fuel as well as not knowing distances between aid stations--which I did to help remove pressure from me.

We started out happy and chatty. Scott and I found ourselves wedged into a group of about 7 …

Buffalo 100 Race Report: how the War was won

This is the first time I am excited to do a race report. I've never felt so.... happily overwhelmed with love, care, support, and kindness from so many people! The short story: I struggled with early vomiting, negativity, and decided to DNF at mile 27. Then I was talked out of it, rallied, and gave that race (literally) everything I had.
The long story: Friday morning on the drive out to the Buffalo 100, I discussed with Craig and Scott our race plans. I asked Scott if he wanted to hang with me for some miles, saying my only plan was to "have a fun run with friends" until it wasn't fun anymore, and I'd go from there. Given my mishaps in training and tapering, I wanted to go out easy and see what happened. This would be my first time tracking only time of day for fuel as well as not knowing distances between aid stations--which I did to help remove pressure from me.

We started out happy and chatty. Scott and I found ourselves wedged into a group of about 7 other me…

Gear Review: Terrmar 2.0 Climasense Baselayers

As a little Los Angeles girl, it took me a while to catch on to the magic of snow. Sure, I enjoyed bundling up when the winter weather came in (I have many pictures of me as a teenager at football games, in “freezing” 60F weather, bundled up for a blizzard.) But for the majority of my life, winter terrified me. I remember as little girl going sledding with friends. This wasn’t your typical I-live-near-snow sledding. It required 3+ hours of driving to find snowy mountains, a full Saturday, and often chains to get around the limited roads where there was enough snow to sled on. Snow was a bitter mystery: it was warm and playful in the sun, but burned cold against my wet jeans and wet cotton thermals. My experiences were limited. Why bother with snow when the beach was closer? My second semester of college it snowed every day for 2 weeks—without stopping, without breaks of sunshine. In rural Idaho where I schooled, the city wouldn’t plow the roads until the storm passed. Like any colleg…

if I am a Shameless Self-Promoter

It would be much easier, to resist this urge to write. I could hibernate and refuse to inspire, encourage, and grow a sport I love. To be safe from criticisms piled atop of my own criticisms. Why not quietly do what I love and leave social media alone?

But I feel to do so, for me, would be to abandon another gift- the ability to put feelings in words, to encourage others to see through another's eyes. To abandon writing would be to abandon another love of mine. If I couldn't feel the emotional reprieve of running, the chapped lips, salt crusting around my hairline, watching laughter dance on a bluebird sky... If I can't be in that moment, I want to feel it, know it, yearn for it. Write it. Share it. 
Writing is (always has been) my first love. It was in words I experienced my first summit, first kiss, first death. I felt the trauma of loss and the playfulness of elation in fictional friends who never judged me, only taught. Friends who gave me a chance to discover myself by …

if I am a Shameless Self-Promoter

It would be much easier, to resist this urge to write. I could hibernate and refuse to inspire, encourage, and grow a sport I love. To be safe from criticisms piled atop of my own criticisms. Why not quietly do what I love and leave social media alone?

But I feel to do so, for me, would be to abandon another gift- the ability to put feelings in words, to encourage others to see through another's eyes. To abandon writing would be to abandon another love of mine. If I couldn't feel the emotional reprieve of running, the chapped lips, salt crusting around my hairline, watching laughter dance on a bluebird sky... If I can't be in that moment, I want to feel it, know it, yearn for it. Write it. Share it. 
Writing is (always has been) my first love. It was in words I experienced my first summit, first kiss, first death. I felt the trauma of loss and the playfulness of elation in fictional friends who never judged me, only taught. Friends who gave me a chance to discover myself b…

The Wedge 2014

In February, I had the opportunity to run "The Wedge" aka the Goodwater Rim Trail in the Little Grand Canyon, south of Price, UT. My husband, Ben, and our two kids came down and camped the night before, along with our friends Matt and Craig.


Since I was recovering from the flu and coming down with a sinus infection, the run "didn't go as planned" for me. That said, I had a wonderful time running with friends and camping with my family.

I wrote a poem while I was down there. Nothing fancy, just a few lines about the people, the desert, and the tides of life. I write poetry often and share little, primarily because poetry has a way of making others feel uncomfortable, and let's face it--I need as few social barriers as possible! But writing is meant to be read, shared, felt. I'm trying to share a little more of the type of writing I love (poems) since most of the time people only get a glimpse of my typical snarky, saucy, and witty article voice.


The Line Be…

The Wedge 2014

In February, I had the opportunity to run "The Wedge" aka the Goodwater Rim Trail in the Little Grand Canyon, south of Price, UT. My husband, Ben, and our two kids came down and camped the night before, along with our friends Matt and Craig.


Since I was recovering from the flu and coming down with a sinus infection, the run "didn't go as planned" for me. That said, I had a wonderful time running with friends and camping with my family.

I wrote a poem while I was down there. Nothing fancy, just a few lines about the people, the desert, and the tides of life. I write poetry often and share little, primarily because poetry has a way of making others feel uncomfortable, and let's face it--I need as few social barriers as possible! But writing is meant to be read, shared, felt. I'm trying to share a little more of the type of writing I love (poems) since most of the time people only get a glimpse of my typical snarky, saucy, and witty article voice.


The Line …

Buffalo 100: Pre-Race Euology

Why does writing this pre-race ramp-up feel like writing a eulogy? Buffalo 100 mile raceIn a way, this is a eulogy, which I dedicate (with sincerest apologies) to the early death of my hopes and dreams. Hopes and dreams for race day performance, I appreciate your novel coercion to get me out running when I should have been recovering from injuries. Your lofty ways convinced me to attempt long runs when I had the stomach flu, fevers, sinus infection, and various lower leg injuries. In the end, it was your perfectionist flaw that took you down.
In conclusion to this eulogy, I will reference a vague saying. “When someone dies a baby is born and thus is the circle of life.” While a terrible condolence and a poor attempt at a fallacy of logic, I will use this quote. So, with the death of hopes and dreams for race day, something new is born: sullen low expectations. Earl: "You better be able to outrun me, woman."
Oh, I’ll try my darndest to reach my time goals and get to my mile marke…

Buffalo 100: Pre-Race Euology

Why does writing this pre-race ramp-up feel like writing a eulogy? In a way, this is a eulogy, which I dedicate (with sincerest apologies) to the early death of my hopes and dreams. Hopes and dreams for race day performance, I appreciate your novel coercion to get me out running when I should have been recovering from injuries. Your lofty ways convinced me to attempt long runs when I had the stomach flu, fevers, sinus infection, and various lower leg injuries. In the end, it was your perfectionist flaw that took you down.
In conclusion to this eulogy, I will reference a vague saying. “When someone dies a baby is born and thus is the circle of life.” While a terrible condolence and a poor attempt at a fallacy of logic, I will use this quote. So, with the death of hopes and dreams for race day, something new is born: sullen low expectations.
Oh, I’ll try my darndest to reach my time goals and get to my mile markers on time. But I’m expecting utter failure. I went into the Bryce 100 all…